Shambhala (Hive Bee)
04-18-02 05:54
No 298485
      Get The HG Out(Thermometer)  Bookmark   


Next time I go back there I'm going to buy 20 of them. I'll have plenty of mercury if I ever need it.



  How much HG is in a 'standard' Wally World thermometer?  How many would one need to purchase to have o 20-30g of HG(ALOT? SHRUG?)  Was a post missed somewhere?  Or how about this Thermometer swim has to stick into their flask?  Is that a better source?  I realize people have mentioned numerous sources for HG.  However, currently I am curious mostly about the amount in a cheap Wally World/DrugStore therm?


Swim just has a few questions, it's all good.  Keep your clothes on.
 
 
 
 
    alchemy_bee
(Hive Bee)
04-18-02 07:44
No 298514
      take the bulb in your teeth and grind it to power ...  Bookmark   

take the bulb in your teeth and grind it to power in your mouth, then your eyes should start to bleed pure mercury.

just kidding, there was lest than .1ml in a big one i emptieed once, hey, a great source of mercury is from mining companies. hobbyest small time gold panners use Mercurt all the time

Can a bee be visa vis its entity when half a bee philosophically must ipso facto half not be?
 
 
 
 
    Shambhala
04-18-02 08:08
      Dars Gold In Dem Hillz
(Rated as: no sources!)
 Bookmark   
 
 
 
    blaztoff
(Hive Bee)
04-18-02 10:04
No 298570
      Mercury  Bookmark   

Read [No 289993]
20-30 grams mercury elemental or chloride for that matter is a hell of a lot of mercury. Doubtfull if you will ever need that much. A little bit goes a long way. Lots of old theremometers at lab supply have them. Last time swim was there they wer on sale 2 for 5 dollars with -13 to 300C partial submersion and all sorts. Guess there getting rid of all the mercury. Swim accidentally broke one there was probally .2-.4 grams of mercury in there.
 
 
 
 
    Shambhala
(Hive Bee)
04-18-02 18:43
No 298714
      Ok. . . that was just going off the Zygoat ...  Bookmark   

Ok. . . that was just going off the Zygoat reccomendation:

Measure 20g Hg



HgI2 Post 106043 (hellman: "Re: HgI2", Chemistry Discourse) & Post 104506 (lost in the sauce: "Re: HgI2", Chemistry Discourse) seems a nice route? Some folks have reccomended step 1 of Zygoat writeup as well(Baalchemist comes to mind).  However, those posts can't be surfaced @ this exact second.  BS says it's ok   Post 55539 (BrightStar: "Re: mercuric chloride help", Newbee Forum).  So, we will belive it.  Three damn choices HgS04, HgI2, & HgCl2.  Ugh, Foxy gives us more Post 181997 (foxy2: "Re: mercuric chloride", Chemicals & Equipment).  Look Max gives us more ideas as well Post 15492 (MaDMAx: "Re: Mercuric Chloride Acquisition", Newbee Forum)!  Some expermintation is in order.  BTW here is the Zygoat thread for those who may care Post 42278 (ZyGoat: "How to make HgCl2 (better method)", Chemistry Discourse)  Anyone see an advantage of using HgI2 over HgSO4?  Mabey this is where the expermintation comes in, eh?



Swim just has a few questions, it's all good.  Keep your clothes on.
 
 
 
 
    blaztoff
(Hive Bee)
04-19-02 03:22
No 298890
      Mercury  Bookmark   

If youre trying to syth HgCl2 try instead HgI2. Hell of a lot easier and quicker. But then again One syth of HgCl2 will probally be more than you ever need so good practice and learning tool. See thread [HgCl2 screw up] 
 
 
 
 
    Elementary
(Hive Addict)
04-19-02 03:42
No 298900
      Info  Bookmark   



Household Items That May Contain Mercury:

Thermometers - typically contain about gram of this silver colored liquid (non-mercury alternatives are available)
  
Thermostats - inside the sealed glass "tilt switch" (not the newer electronic kind)
 
Automotive headlamps (ONLY the ones with the blue tint when lit)
 
Pilot light sensors - in SOME gas appliances such as stoves, ovens, clothes dryers, water heaters, furnaces and space heaters
 
Gauges - barometers, manometers, blood pressure and vacuum gauges ONLY with silver colored liquid
 
Electrical switches and relays - typically contains about 3.5 grams of mercury in SOME chest freezers, pre-1972 washing machines, sump pumps, electric space heaters, clothes irons, silent light switches and automatic car hood & trunk lights.
 
Some athletic shoes (made before 1997 ONLY) with flashing lights in soles
 
Vintage toys & games - toy drawing screens and mercury maze games
 
Fluorescent bulbs and other mercury vapor lighting - HID (high intensity discharge), metal halide, high pressure sodium and neon bulbs (environmentally preferable because they are more energy-efficient)

http://www.dep.state.ct.us/wst/mercury/hshld.htm
http://www.hermograph.com/science/mercury3.htm



Nobodys home
 
 
 
 
    Elementary
(Hive Addict)
04-19-02 04:06
No 298914
      Lovely Pictures  Bookmark   







Nobodys home
 
 
 
 
    alchemy_bee
(Hive Bee)
04-19-02 20:27
No 299175
      bulk HG from mining  Bookmark   

You probably wont find a site online that openly sells mercury without really looking, but im sure there are some places out there and you more than likely would have to just call them up and ask if they no anyone you can call.

A more effective approach, which i have done a few times, is actually finding a local gold prospecting club or travel to an area that attracts a lot of gold prospecting. Any 'old timer' has a little stash pot of mercury, and also many who operate gold dredges use mercury.

Just for back ground information, when processing gold by hand (pan) or in larger motorized setups like a dredge, you end up with (after panning off the lighter top dirt) black sand i.e. iron ore. Since this is only the second heaviest mineralization you will find where gold is found, it makes it easy to pick out the larger flakes of gold out of. Many prospectors pick out the visible flakes of gold from this black sand and also hold onto the rest, and after a season of panning they run mercury through this black sand to recollect small pieces of gold.

Gold actually chemically amalgamates/bonds to gold (and not to iron), so running some mercury through black sand effectively pulls the remaining gold out. The mercury is then chemically removed (dangerous) or even burned off (even more dangerous). One common method is halving a potato putting the gold mercury in the middle, warping with tin foil and tossing into a fire and collect in the morning.

Its a pretty crazy process, understand this is probably why you wont find a commercial site openly selling it. Go to a big news stand and pick up a copy of any one of a few gold prospecting magazines and you'll find listings in the back for many small town prospecting supply shops, which are usually run by said 'old timers' or the such, so call around.

Can a bee be visa vis its entity when half a bee philosophically must ipso facto half not be?
 
 
 
 
    raffike
(Stranger)
04-21-02 18:19
No 299825
      There is some(lots more than in thermometer) ...  Bookmark   

There is some(lots more than in thermometer) mercury in older doorbells.And of course thermometer.Of course you sholdn't break a thermometer with red liquid bcuz this isn't mercury but alcohol with some red crap innit.
Elementary: you got very nice pics.smile
btw 30 grams of Hg isn't very much.Only bout 2,2 ml(Hg's density is 13,6 g/cm3).
 
 
 
 
    blaztoff
(Hive Bee)
04-21-02 23:42
No 299874
      HgCl2  Bookmark   

30g Hg should get you around 25-30g HgCl2. 100-120mg HgCl2 used per run via Al/nitro can net you between 250-300 amalgations. At that scale that will take a hell of a long time to be used up. Swim still has the 2 100g bottle from Sigma-Aldrich  he bought a couple years ago and barelly dented one of them.
 
 
 
 
    Mindflux
(Stranger)
08-16-02 09:37
No 345936
      I remember as a kid, my father had a large jar of ...  Bookmark   

I remember as a kid, my father had a large jar of mercury always sitting around on his workbench.  He used to show me it run, which is cool when you are 9.  The jar must have weighed 5lbs... I wonder where it went...  wink
 
 
 
 
    starlight
(Hive Bee)
08-16-02 11:21
No 345946
      barometer refills  Bookmark   

there are places where you can buy refills for mercury barometers online.

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