PolytheneSam (Master Searcher)
05-12-02 00:33
No 307537
      Hotbox melting point tester  Bookmark   

This "Hotbox" brand melting point tester comes in handy for testing melting points.  The sample is put between two glass cover plates on the block on the left with the thermometer in it.  The device is turned on and set at 10 or 20 per minute (only two settings) and you wait and watch the mercury go up the thermometer until the sample melts.






http://www.geocities.com/dritte123/PSPF.html
The hardest thing to explain is the obvious
 
 
 
 
    LaBTop
(Daddy)
05-12-02 03:38
No 307582
      yep,  Bookmark   

This should be easily reproduceble for the well equiped home hobbyist.
Remember, the glassplates are placed on top of the 2 blocks, so you can see when the sample melts.
It's not inside the blocks.
Sam, do you know what material the 2 blocks are made of? Carbon or copper or aluminum or something else?
And this thingy is meant to test melting points of SOLIDS, not fluids, to prevent any questions about that. LT/

WISDOMwillWIN
 
 
 
 
    PolytheneSam
(Master Searcher)
05-12-02 04:05
No 307584
      block, etc.  Bookmark   

I'm refering to that thing sticking up as a block.  Its more of a heating element or little hot plate with a hole in the side for a thermometer.  It seems to be made of metal, its not attracted to a magnet and there seems to be a heating element in it.  The paint is coming off in some places and it looks like aluminum underneath.  I've seen professional versions which are similar.  If you don't have any little cover plates (like the ones for microscope slides) you could probably use aluminum foil in place of them.  Here's something that's similar.  http://www.chem.yorku.ca/profs/hempsted/chemed/equipment/melt.html

http://www.geocities.com/dritte123/PSPF.html
The hardest thing to explain is the obvious
 
 
 
 
    PolytheneSam
(Master Searcher)
05-12-02 04:39
No 307590
      more  Bookmark   

I wonder if there are some plans somewhere or a patent to look at.
http://www.acp.edu/facultystaff/genchem/GC1/lab/labtech/melt/melt.htm

http://www.geocities.com/dritte123/PSPF.html
The hardest thing to explain is the obvious
 
 
 
 
    pandemonium
(Hive Addict)
05-12-02 04:44
No 307592
      Hot!  Bookmark   

I bet any semiconductor/resistor type of material would work...

Thanks, Sam!

Fight Terror! - support your local Alchemists, Brewers, and Cultivators Guild!
 
 
 
 
    lugh
(Moderator)
05-12-02 14:07
No 307665
      Vogel's  Bookmark   

As previously posted, Vogel's has a similar device using a household iron as the metal block. A rheostat is used to raise the temperature, one could automate that easily. A pyrometer can be substituted for the thermometer, you can either use a glass slide for corrosive compounds, or just use the surface of the iron for any that's been washed of acid residues.
 
 
 
 
    Organikum
(Hive Bee)
05-12-02 16:23
No 307667
      pyrometer  Bookmark   


how to build a pyrometer can be found here:

http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/optpyro.html


ORGY

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law
 
 
 
 
    lugh
(Moderator)
05-13-02 00:48
No 307745
      Probe  Bookmark   

SWIL's experience is with a service pyrometer with a probe such as:



but an optical pyrometer should work very well also smile
 
 
 
 
    PolytheneSam
(Master Searcher)
05-14-02 00:48
No 308142
      pics  Bookmark   

The pictures stopped showing up.  Let's try this.

http://community.webshots.com/photo/28091044/37757350yqJMAJ

http://community.webshots.com/photo/28091044/37757442haNnbw

http://www.geocities.com/dritte123/PSPF.html
The hardest thing to explain is the obvious